Family Rules
Always Be Honest  Proverbs 12:22
Count Your Blessing  Psalms 34:1-3
Keep Your Promises  Romans 4:21
Comfort One Another  1 Thessalonians 4:18
and above all...Love One Another  1 Peter 1:22
Be Supportive of one Another  Acts 20:35
Be Kind and Tenderhearted  Ephesians 4:32
5 Cardinal Rules for Life
1.)  Make peace with your past....so it won’t disturb your present.
2.)  What other people think of you...is none of your business.
3.)  Time heals almost everything....give it time.
4.)  No one is in charge of your happiness....except you.
5.)  Don’t compare your life to others.....and don’t judge them, you have no idea what their journey is all about.

Gospel Meditation - April 11, 2021

2nd Sunday of Easter (Divine Mercy Sunday)

   What a wonderful joy fills us today as we ponder the inexhaustible mercy of God. “Mercy is the heart of God,” Pope Francis tells us. The image of a heart has been used to point to the very life source of a person as it is the organ that allows life to flow through our veins and sustain us. Mercy is the heart of God. Imagine this dy-namic, powerful, compassionate, piercing, embracing, loving, propelling, penetrating, absorbing, and enveloping, transforming presence of God flowing into the very depth of our souls. It is God’s mercy that allows blood to flow through our veins. It is God’s mercy that forms every atom of our being and leads us to what is true. God’s mercy reveals all superficiality and falsehood, and lays bare all distortions, empty promises, weakness, and sin.
   “Mercy is the force that reawakens us to new life and instills in us the courage to look to the future with hope,” Pope Francis continues. God’s all forgiving, compas-sionate love is with us. When we finally believe and accept that Christ’s resurrected transfigured presence resides with us, we then find within us a strong confidence to accept life’s imperfections and disappointments and move on. Every day is a new adventure in new life. God leaves the past behind and opens doors to the future. It doesn’t matter how many mistakes we made yesterday. All that matters is what we do tomorrow and what we learn along the way. It is so easy to remain tethered and mired in the past, but there is no need to do so. God is all about tomorrow and the work God has yet to do in our lives.
   Mercy gives birth to hope. Hope for the greatest of sinners and hope for the worst of disasters. There is nothing God cannot do and nothing God cannot fashion. After all, everything we know and treasure was once nothing, and look what God did with the nothing God had! The resurrected Christ stands before us with nail marks in his wrists and wounds on his body as a testament that not even injustice, suffering and death can trample over and destroy God’s mercy. What have we to fear? Why do we keep ourselves from peace? Our lack of faith prevents us from going forward and fully receiving the holiness God desires to breathe upon us. Breathe in God’s mercy, allow the wind of God’s presence to kiss all of your sins and caress all of your fears. Exhale peace
©LPi





Weekly Meditation
My Lord and my God!    (John 20:28)
(From a homily by Pope Francis for Divine Mercy Sunday, April 7, 2013)
    In today’s Gospel, the apostle Thomas personally experiences the mercy of God, which has a concrete face, the face of Jesus, the risen Jesus. Thomas does not believe it when the other apostles tell him, ‘We have seen the Lord’ (John 20:25). It isn’t enough for him that Jesus had foretold it. . . . . He wants to see; he wants to put his hand in the place of the nails and in Jesus’ side.
   And how does Jesus react? With patience: Jesus does not abandon Thom-as in his stubborn unbelief; he gives him a week’s time, he does not close the door, he waits. And Thomas acknowledges his own poverty, his little faith.
   “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28). With this simple yet faith-filled invocation, he responds to Jesus’ patience. He lets himself be enveloped by divine mercy; he sees it before his eyes, in the wounds of Christ’s hands and feet and in his open side, and he discovers trust: he is a new man, no longer an unbeliever, but a believer. . . .
   “Maybe someone among us here is thinking: my sin is so great, I am as far from God as the younger son in the parable, my unbelief is like that of Thomas; I don’t have the courage to go back, to believe that God can wel-come me and that he is waiting for me, of all people. But God is indeed waiting for you; he asks of you only the courage to go to him. . . .
   “Let us find the courage to return to his house, to dwell in his loving wounds, allowing ourselves to be loved by him and to encounter his mercy in the sacraments. We will feel his wonderful tenderness, we will feel his embrace, and we too will become more capable of mercy, patience, for-giveness and love.”
“My Lord and my God! Thank you for your unending mercy!”  (Colossians 3:11)
(Lenten Edition - The Word Among Us)